Brake Upgrade with Frozen Rotors – Front

As part of my re-gear and tire size upgrade I wanted to improve brake performance on My Toyota FJ Cruiser. To this end I chose to upgrade the rotors and pads on the FJ to slotted rotors and better pads. I chose to go with cryogenically treated slotted rotors from Frozen Rotors combined with Hawk Performance pads. Cryogenically treated rotors have been shown to have more resistance to warping and cracking, an increases rotor and pad life, as wells as reduced brake fade  The “freezing” of the rotors changes the crystal structure of the metal.

Wrenching on the FJ

The rotors are not cheap but the extended life and improvement in brake performance should justify the cost.

The installation of the front rotors and pads is an easy process. With the rear tires chalked I lifted the front of the FJ with my floor jack and placed jack stand under the a-arms to keep the FJ from falling if the jack failed.

First the front wheels need to be removed to expose the calipers and rotors. The calipers must be spread to allow the new pads to be fitted. I did this with channel locks and some screw drivers. I was not concerned about damage to the rotors or pads so the screw drivers worked well.

Calipers spread

Once I had the calipers spread I removed the old pads and inserted the new ones to check the fit.  The fit was good so I then proceeded to remove the caliper. With the caliper removed the rotor came free of the hub with a couple of hits with a rubber mallet.

Checking the fit on the new pads

I installed the new rotor and reinstalled the caliper. Once the caliper was installed I then installed the new pads using brake lube to help prevent any problems with nose.

Job Complete

The front tires were remounted and the nuts torqued to the correct value and it was off for a test drive.

All said this was about a 1 hour job and not that difficult.

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tomas

Tomas has lived in Colorado since age 5. Having grown up on the Western Slope of Colorado lots of time was spent in the Desert Southwest. Tomas' father introduced him to the love of 4 wheeling at an early age in the high mountains around Aspen, Colorado. While an avid Mountain Biker, Tomas and his Family enjoy adventures in the mountains and desert in the remote locations that can only be reached by 4wd. Day hikes are always a must when on the family trips. While enjoying outdoor activities he wants to share his love as a certified 4wd trainer and ski instructor. Tomas also enjoys caving and cave exploration. Tomas currently resides in Colorado Springs. 

  6 comments for “Brake Upgrade with Frozen Rotors – Front

  1. Don Newman
    March 18, 2010 at 8:03 AM

    Thomas,
    I just pulled my stock pads to check for replacement, and both front and rear pads have ore than a third left on them. That’s with 38,000 miles. I was both shocked and pleased. How much more than that are you estimating that you will get with this new set up? Is it mainly the rotors you are expecting an extended life from?

    thanks,
    Don

    • March 18, 2010 at 10:01 AM

      The rotors should last longer. I was at 50,000 and was close to needing the front pads replaced. If I was not looking for better brake performance I would have let the pads wear all the way and then just replaced the pads.

      • Don Newman
        March 18, 2010 at 11:41 PM

        Thanks Thomas. Keep up the good work. Hey, hows that onboard air coming along?

    • March 18, 2010 at 10:01 AM

      The rotors should last longer. I was at 50,000 and was close to needing the front pads replaced. If I was not looking for better brake performance I would have let the pads wear all the way and then just replaced the pads.

  2. dale durham
    May 12, 2010 at 11:26 AM

    Excellent write up on both the front and rear replacement. A must do mod for sure!

  3. jonathan derise
    December 7, 2012 at 1:05 PM

    89k and i jst did the rotors and breaks

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